Place Value

Students must be able to...
  • Use objects and pictorial models to compose and decompose numbers in more than one way
  • Compose and decompose numbers up to 100,000 using compatible numbers 
  • Use expanded form to write numbers up to 100,000
  • Describe the relationship between numbers in the number system (ten times the position to the right)
  • Place a number on a number line between multiples of 10; 100; 1,000 and 10,000
  • Use "closer to," "is about," and "is nearly" to describe the location on a number line and the relative size of a number.
  • Round numbers to the nearest 10; 100; 1,000 or 10,000 on and off a number line
  • Compare and order numbers up to 100,000
  • Use the symbols >, <, or = to show how numbers compare
  • Use rounding to estimate sums and differences in word problems
  • Use compatible numbers to estimate sums and differences



Addition and Subtraction with Data Analysis

Students must be able to:
  • Make generalizations about frequency tables (tally charts), bar graphs, pictographs and dot plots.
  • Determine intervals used in a graph.
  • Analyze bar graphs, pictographs and dot plots to tell about and summarize data.
  • Use charts and graphs to solve one and two step problems.
  • Identify the addition and subtraction relationship using numbers in a table.
  • Create a table the represents real-world situations.
  • Solve one and two step addition and subtraction problems based on place value, properties of operations and the relationship between addition and subtraction (fact families)
  • Use pictures, number lines and equations to represent addition and subtraction problems.
  • Count a collection of coins and bills. 
  • Find the perimeter of a polygon.
  • Determine the missing length of a side when given the perimeter or a polygon and the lengths of the other sides.


Multiplication and Division Basics

Students must be able to:
  • Represent multiplication and division problems using arrays, strip diagrams, and equations including repeated addition
  • Use what they know about multiplication to determine a quotient.
  • Use what they know about the relationship between multiplication and division to solve for a missing number.
  • Solve one-step multiplication/division problems using a variety of strategies (arrays, area model, number lines, skip counting, etc).
  • Separate a number of objects into two equal groups to determine if the number is even or odd.
  • Use the divisibility of 2 rule to determine if a number is even or odd.
  • Automatically recall multiplication facts
  • Use what they know about multiplication to recall division facts.
  • Describe multiplication as a comparison (3x9 represents three times as much as nine)
  • Use mathematical symbols to represent a multiplication situation
  • Divide a set of objects into equal shares to determine the number of groups
  • Divide a set of objects into equal groups to determine the number of objects in each group.
  • Combine equal groups of objects​



Fractions

Students must be able to:
  • separate shapes into equal parts in more than one way and name each part as a fraction.
  • represent/show fractions using objects, pictorial models, strip diagrams, and number lines.
  • name the fraction for a given point on a number line.
  • label a given fraction in the appropriate location on a number line.
  • describe a unit fraction based on the denominator.
  • explain how the denominator affects the fraction.
  • explain why two fractions are not equivalent.
  • represent equivalent fractions using objects, pictorial models, and number lines.
  • compare two fractions with like numerators
  • compare two fractions with like denominators.
  • justify why one fraction is greater than/less than another.
  • compose/decompose fractions as a sum of unit fractions.
  • solve problems by partitioning an object or set of objects equally.
  • explain why two fractions are or are not equivalent based on the whole or their positions on a number line.
  • represent fractions as distances from zero on a number line.



Geometry

Students must be able to:
  • compare, classify and sort two-dimensional figures based on their attributes.
  • compare, classify and sort three-dimensional figures based on their attributes.
  • use formal geometric language to describe how figures are sorted.
  • compare, classify and sort quadrilaterals into categories.
  • draw examples and non-examples of the 5 types of quadrilaterals (rhombus, square, rectangle, parallelogram and trapezoid)
  • use the number of rows and number of unit squares in a row to determine the area of a rectangle.
  • use repeated addition to determine the area of a rectangle.
  • multiply to find the area of a rectangle.
  • break a figure into smaller rectangles in order to find the total area.
  • find the perimeter or a polygon.
  • determine a missing length when given the perimeter of a polygon and lengths of the other sides.